Fire Destroys Animal Sanctuary and Home

https://www.gofundme.com/help-second-chance-wildlife-sanctuary-rebuild?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=fb_dn_postdonate_r&fbclid=IwAR2NZLTMkQZEj3BziA6qNUxWdjzmYbggu09jTZ6o4OsnkUiGgNXpFuH7aqY

Please help to rebuild Jim’s Wildlife Sanctuary and his home.

Jim is an amazing person. He has a deep love of all animals and an unquenchable spirit of love and kindness to all.  He humanely traps animals to help fund the sanctuary and is an accomplished artistic painter which also helps him with the sanctuary and his livelihood.

Recently there was a terrible fire that burned Jim’s home on the property and killed many animals.  Jim was asleep when a peacock began squawking which woke Jim up. He was only able to rescue one of his pet dogs that slept with him.

Many animals were in cages below the two-story home that sat on stilts.  They all lost their lives.  Jim lost everything.   His clothing, phone, computer, painting supplies, you name it.  He was left with just the clothes on his back.

Although Jim has lots of support, it is going to take a lot to rebuild.  And even after that the sanctuary will need to be funded.  If you can donate, you can donate through the above GoFundMe account or through Jim’s website at: http://www.secondchancewildlifesanctuary.org           – Thank you!

 

 

 

 

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Fire Destroys Animal Sanctuary and Home

Joel Rosenthal has lived with bears, foxes and much other wildlife.

 

joe1Joel Rosenthal is living the dream most of us dream of.  Living with wildlife.
I mean really living! He is a biologist, rescuer in the hills of West Virginia with a vast tract of land he calls “Point of View Farm.”
Joel tirelessly works every day to save the lives of injured and orphaned wild animals that are brought to him from around the area.

He has one bear named Rose who he raised as an orphan and was released to the wild that returns from time to time to see him.  This year when she came, she gave birth to two cubs.  Joel locks her up if it is hunting season to protect her.  This is her third litter.

Contrary to what wildlife agencies put out about interacting with wildlife, Joel interacts successfully and continues to prove their theories wrong.

Here is a post that Joel made on his Facebook page.

Shared with permission.

Studying Wildlife

STUDYING WILDLIFE

Around the world there are thousands of wildlife biologists who have been taught that the only way for humans to study wildlife is from a distance and without contact. The theory is that animals will react differently if humans are present. This “theory” extends to the concept that any contact between wildlife and humans “makes” the animal fearless of humans and therefore a direct threat to becoming at the very least a nuisance if not dangerous. The saying “ A fed bear is a dead bear” is used all the time. And indeed almost any bear who comes in contact with humans is killed. The false narrative continues by saying that an animal hand raised by a human becomes dysfunctional and dependent on humans.

And should any wildlife biologist dare to integrate themselves into a population of wild animals to study them that biologist is immediately condemned and criticized for life by the academics who really know nothing about wildlife.

Fortunately, there have been notable examples to demonstrate the hollowness of this dogma.

Some noted examples are Jane Goodall, Joy Adamson, Diane Fosse and Lynn Rogers. It is noteworthy that three on this list are women.

Each has shown us that once an animal or an animal population becomes so familiar with the presence of a human that animal population just carries on as if the human was not even there.

And in everyday life there are dozens of wild animals that have integrated themselves everyday into our very urban lives often without our even noticing. Raccoons, skunks, foxes, and even coyotes, deer and mountain lions are examples.

So, that brings me to POVF and Joel Rosenthal. No one tells me how to handle, rehabilitate or interact with any wild animal I get. This gives me the flexibility that almost no other facility around the world has. And as all of you know I am a “hands on” fellow.

This has allowed me to learn so very much about the real mannerisms, traits and even thinking that an animal does. There are hundreds if not thousands of people who have foxes as “pets.” But those foxes are not permitted to be wild. I, on the other hand, have this relationship with a wild fox, Mink, who comes and goes, hunts, mates and has her own offspring. Yet, because I am simply background noise she carries on her unadulterated wildness right in front of me.

Over the years I have now had 30 bears. All of them received personal attention most for as long as 18 months before they went off on their own. None has attacked a person. None has raided a house or cabin. None has spent their life begging for food. None has become a nuisance.

And then of course there is Rose from whom I have learned so very much about bears. She is nine years old now and has survived all this time by avoiding humans when she is in the wild. She has claimed the territory around POVF as hers. Yes, she does come into my house, but has never tried to enter anyone else’s. Yes, she looks forward to the snacks I give her, yet she has never approached anyone else for food.

So why are we humans still so very ignorant and stupid about the very essence of what a wild animal is all about and how they think. Why is it that students today are still taught so much nonsense and false information about wildlife and how to study and understand them?

 


Follow Joel on Facebook at:  https://www.facebook.com/joel.rosenthal.140joel.jpg

Joel Rosenthal has lived with bears, foxes and much other wildlife.

New Guided Nature Hikes in Central Florida

ecotiereaaa

Ecotiere.com is now offering nature hikes and lectures.

 

Expert wildlife specialist Fred Bohler is now ready to take you hiking and teach

all about Florida’s wonderful wildlife. You’ll explore and learn about tracks, bones,

habitat, creatures and many other things while you enjoy a fun hike with one of

Central Florida’s most knowledgeable nature lovers. 


About Fred Bohler:

fred1

Fred Bohler is a wildlife specialist and an accomplished speaker desiring to further the understanding between humans and wildlife.

.Fred has a special interest in reptiles, crocodilians, and arachnids.

His work has involved radio and television including programs such as Animal Planet.

He has also worked as a herpetologist and animal care specialist for zoological institutions and various government agencies and has closely worked with black bears.

His “life mission” is solving myths and phobias through wildlife education for the general public as well as one on one.


Guided Eco Nature Hikes

There are three locations to choose your hike from:

 

  • Wekiwa State Park – A  7,000-acre Florida State Park in Apopka, Florida.
  • Fechtel Tract – Lower Wekiva State Preserve – 8300 W. State Road 46, Sanford, FL
  • Rock Springs Run State Reserve Park – 30601 County Road 433
    Sorrento FL

Lectures

Lectures take place at Wekiva Island – 1014 Miami Springs Dr, Longwood, FL

fred4

For Booking Your Hike or Lecture and More Information, Go To –  http://www.ecotiere.com

 

Aside

Carlos Beruff is Bad for Florida

A slap in the face was given by Governor Rick Scott during his last days, to all who care
about Florida’s natural resources as he appointed developer Carlos Beruff to the FWC Commission.

For several years now, activists who actually DO care about Florida’s natural resources,
and not with preserving them in order to abuse them or kill them, have been trying to clean up the FWC Commission from the likes of wealthy developers.

Beruff fought to develop land ladened with toxins. He even sued an activist for a million dollars, shoving his wealth and power around to get his way. And he did, sadly. The development is called, “Waverly” and is in Sarasota County. For more –
http://thebradentontimes.com/beruff-suing-activist-over-claims-on-landfill-adjacent-development-p19749-137.htm

“He founded Medallion Homes, a development firm infamous in the Sarasota area for building homes with contaminated, toxic “Chinese drywall” and then sparring with homeowners who said their own houses were sickening them. (New Times conducted its own investigation into Chinese drywall in South Florida in 2010.) During Medallion’s fight with the people it had screwed over, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune caught the company lying about being broke in order to get out of paying settlements
to poisoned homeowners.”
Source:
https://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/carlos-beruff-racist-rich-man-gets-to-rewrite-the-florida-constitution-thanks-to-rick-scott-9259505

He resigned from the Southwest Florida Water Management, which board he served on,
after he voted to approve a friend’s plan to destroy precious wetlands in order to build a home.

His developments have been accused of moving an eagle’s nest without permission and destroying public conservation areas. He wrangled the state wetland-mitigation system so he could plow down 40 acres of mangroves just so he could have a better view of one of his properties. This guy is just bad news.

He has been accused of lying under oath to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement investigators. He also avoided paying $235,000 in taxes by claiming that he was a farmer and a lumberjack. What uncovered other things has he done, I wonder?

When stopped for speeding at 103 mph, he told the officer that his expensive car
drove as safely at that speed as lesser expensive cars do at lower speeds. He lost his license.

Scott seems to love this man having appointed him to several boards, such as the
Constitutional Revision Commission, and others. But of course, Scott loves wealth.

Beruff seems to make it a point to vie against those who wish to preserve Florida’s natural resources.
What kind of voting and mulling around is he going to do on a commission that involves our fish, wildlife and precious land? I think you can figure it out.

We have seen what other developer commissioners have done and how they have voted against the best decisions for Florida. Thankfully several of them finally resigned. Who they have been replaced with is not any better and so if we as Floridians want to preserve Florida for our grandchildren and their children, it is our obligation to fight against such actions and stop them from destroying this beautiful state.

Carlos Beruff is Bad for Florida

Yes, FWC Kills Bears!

Recently an activist stated that FWC does not kill bears.  How bazaar coming from a bear activist who has been involved in stopping the bear hunts.   Anyone can request these records from FWC.

To prove my point about FWC killing bears, I am including some images of records sent to me from FWC of the bears that they have killed during 1/11/15 to 4/11/16. These records do not come color-coded. I did that so I could reference certain things more easily.

bear deaths 2bear deaths 3bear deaths 4bear deaths 1

Yes, FWC Kills Bears!

Spanky, the Death of a Neighborhood Bear – Letter to FWC

This letter was shared and was given permission to reprint.

tavaresbear1

An Open Letter to FWC Executive Director Wiley, Chairman Yablonski, and Commissioners
On October 24th, 2016, a mature, male black bear was illegally shot and killed in my subdivision in Tavares, Lake County. To you, this event may mean nothing more than an additional task for your Law Enforcement Division. To me, and to many of my neighbors, this event was a vicious, senseless crime, and a heartbreaking metaphor for the larger plight of Florida’s wildlife. I would like you to understand what the death of this bear means to us, and to recognize the broader implications of what has just happened here.
I have an intensely personal stake in this case. I grew up in the city of Detroit, Michigan – not exactly the best place for wildlife viewing. In 2006, I was fortunate enough to be able to build my current home, which overlooks one of the last undeveloped parcels of land within the city limits of Tavares. For the last ten years, my family and I have experienced the company of owls, ospreys, a bobcat, coyotes, and even a diamondback rattlesnake. But, since 2009, the animal we most enjoyed was “Spanky,” the bear, whose pathway between “wilderness” and “civilization” took him past our back door.
You probably think it is inappropriate, even silly, for ordinary people like us to give wild animals names. Perhaps we should have given him an impersonal, scientific designation, like B2009. But, to us, the bear was not just an entry in a database or a red dot on a map: he was an individual, a neighbor, virtually a member of our extended family. The person who intentionally took him from us has stolen one of the most cherished parts of our lives – a living being who connected us to wild Florida in a way that nothing else can, adding a magical quality to a daily routine otherwise dominated by long hours of work. When we found ourselves asking why we were working so hard – what we were working for – this solitary bear helped provide a better answer than anything our realtor told us in 2006.
As you may have seen from the television interviews with some of my neighbors, our bear had never presented a threat to our safety. We had many “up close and personal” encounters with Spanky over the years, and not once did he act aggressively. His worst offense was to break into our screened porch – lured in by the irresistible aromas of a recent fish-frying session – but even then we simply shooed him out and realized that we were more responsible for the problem than he was. We learned how to be “bear wise,” and thus for seven years we and Spanky were able to coexist quite happily. For the small price of simple changes in behavior, we reaped the great benefit of having a beautiful animal in our lives.
Your staff often refer to wild animals like Florida black bears as “renewable natural resources.” Spanky was not a “resource.” He was a unique character, living the best life he could in the diminished habitat we humans had left for him, and doing it with a gentle dignity that deserved, and received, our respect. Nor was he “renewable.” He is gone. He will not be – can not be – replaced. We do not mean this in a purely sentimental sense, for the little pocket of habitat that served as his home is far too isolated to ever again receive a bear, unless by some miracle. And the sad truth is that there is scant time for even a miracle to occur, as much of the undeveloped land in question will surely be converted into habitat for humans within the next few years. When we protest, we are told that we can not stand in the way of “progress,” and left to wonder what amount of impact fees can ever compensate a community for the loss of its wild heart.
One might have hoped, at least, that Florida’s “Wildlife Conservation” Commission would share our concerns about the crushing of many wild hearts across the state, yet your response to the killing of our bear was chilling. Mr. Workman – echoing a long line of similar statements in bear-related press releases – told the Leesburg Daily Commercial that your agency “diligently works to limit the challenges presented by our state’s large black bear population, which has been scientifically estimated to be over 4,000 bears.” In these circumstances, it is hard to imagine a more intellectually perverse and morally reprehensible comment.
Your representation of Florida’s black bear situation is exactly backwards. The bear population that you continually refer to as “large and growing,” or “robust and resilient,” is in fact only 0.02% of the human population, a massive disparity perfectly captured by the isolation of our bear, alone amid thousands of people. And his fate – deliberately killed by a human of defective character – poses the question that should be of central concern to any conservation agency worthy of the name; to wit, how to limit the challenges presented to our small black bear population by a vastly larger and infinitely more destructive human population?
It seems to me that there are two very obvious reasons for your blatant and repeated reversal of the proper perspective. First, Florida is “open for business” and your constitutional independence will no more impede the commercial juggernaut rampaging across our state than our city’s zoning board. Beyond this, though, lies a transparent attempt to convince the public, through a steady “drip, drip, drip” of agency messaging, that the state’s bear population is “too large” and must therefore be “managed” by hunting. This being the case, why should any citizen of Florida reporting a wildlife crime expect a satisfactory resolution, when the very agency in charge of the investigation seeks to provide hunters with an “opportunity” to kill the same animals, just under more “regulated” conditions?
In order to demonstrate your competence to protect our wildlife from those who have no more respect for your regulations than they do for God’s creatures, you must first acknowledge the consequences of your own actions. Our bear was killed on the one-year anniversary of last year’s bear hunt. This is surely no coincidence. The killer was clearly disgruntled about being denied a legal “opportunity” to kill this (or perhaps some other) bear, so he decided to flout your authority and have some illegal fun instead. (The “resource,” of course, was completely wasted, because no part of “it” was “harvested.” Maybe that, if nothing else, will command your attention.) Had you not decided to permit a bear hunt in 2015, this uniquely despicable motivation would never have arisen, and our bear would most likely still be with us, enriching our lives as he had for years before. Allowing hunting sent a message that bears were “fair game,” a message that continues to ring in certain ears long after the “season” ended. When you now attempt to outlaw the “taking” of bears you are, in effect, speaking out of both sides of your mouth, and one can only wonder how many other bears have died without media attention as a result of the signal you sent.
I do not, therefore, expect you to care about any sense of “justice” for our bear, even though almost all well-adjusted people believe that he deserves it. But I do imagine that you might wish to protect the credibility of your agency by proving that you are, in fact, capable of conducting a vigorous investigation of a repugnant wildlife crime. For if you can not apprehend and prosecute those who willfully violate your regulations, then your claim that hunting is “regulated” will crumble along with my shattered dream. And if you do not stand up for the remaining animals who are about to be swept away by the rising human tide – if you allow them to be shot in the back, just like Spanky – then the character of your agency will itself be “fair game” for all Floridians who shared a dream similar to mine.
Spanky was a “good ambassador” for his species, winning many friends in our community. The same can not be said for the human who took his life. As stakeholders in the conservation of Florida’s black bear, we must now rely on your agency to hold the killer accountable for his actions, and to keep us notified of your progress at all phases of the investigation. Having contributed to the climate that fomented this crime, you owe us no less. The debt you owe to Spanky, however, can never be repaid.
Sincerely,
Jacqueline Elfers Nicholson,
Tavares, FL

 

Spanky, the Death of a Neighborhood Bear – Letter to FWC

Pedals Killer Come Forth

pedalsbody

This, sadly, is Pedals.  This is what happened to the beloved bear.  Tell me how this makes sense that his life should have been taken?

Although we cannot tell for sure who killed Pedals, the bi-pedal bear.
There are surely people who know and should be telling. For one,
a person who may not have killed him is catching all the flack, as is
his family and business. Not that this person didn’t set himself up for
this, he did. He bragged about going to kill Pedals for three years and
as the time came closer it got worse. He taunted people who loved
Pedals showing himself to be one sick puppy. Who would set out
to kill a harmless, lame bear who had done no wrong and wouldn’t?
All black bears have been unjustly vilified. But Pedals was lame.

There are those hunters among some ethical ones that give them all
a black eye. It’s the heartless, soulless, trophy, thrill seeking sick
individuals that eat, drink and breathe the blood of an innocent animal.

There are many “game” species that hunters are allowed to hunt and
most go without any complaint. Then there are the magnificent creatures
that nobody should be hunting. And those that are rare, or injured.

Most people take pity on an injured animal and seek to help it. It is a
rare breed that sets out to kill it saying they are putting it out of its misery.

Pedals was surviving quite well. Without the need to be in a sanctuary to
keep it from being murdered, it would have continued to do well.

The world is made of all kinds of people. Some make it better, some make
it worse. I think I can safely say, that the person who killed Pedals is not
making it a better place.

 

Pedals Killer Come Forth